How Do Big Japanese Cities Stay So Clean?

  • SOCIETY
  • CULTURE
  • With Tokyo being the cleanest city in Asia and another Japanese city Kobe ranked number 3, one might wonder, how such big metropolises manage to stay clean. Tokyo. i.e. has a population of 13 millions and works hard to keep the city as clean and as environmentally friendly as possible. It also has the lowest carbon dioxide emissions in the whole of Asia. How is it possible to control such a big city?

    Waste sorting

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    There are various factors playing a significant role, strict waste sorting is surely one of them. Depending on the city and sometimes even ward, garbage is separated into combustible and incombustible, additionally recyclables such as plastic bottles, glass bottles and paper are collected separately.

    Surprisingly, the streets of the capital of Japan are extremely clean. Litter and trash is rarely seen. Due to dust bins at convenience stores and at stations people can get rid of their trash easily and littering is prevented.

    Citizens

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    Additionally, Japanese are taught great responsibility since early childhood, that everyone is responsible for their own garbage and needs to, if necessary, take it home. That is why public leisure places like parks usually stay clean too, even after events like the cherry blossom viewing, or the beach, after a sunny summer day.

    Generally, people in Japan respect their surroundings, whether it is human or material. Graffiti is also rather rare and vandalism seldom happens.

    Designated smoking sections

    Finally, many of the crowded wards of Tokyo, such as Shibuya or Shinjuku, have various kinds of anti-smoking laws. There are special designated smoking sections in areas and it is illegal and will be punished with a fine if one is caught smoking outside those areas. Therefore, cigarette butts left on the ground is also a rare thing to see.

    Japan is still improving and with everyone’s contribution, we can make it an even cleaner place!

    Featured image: jp.fotolia.com/