3 Common Japanese Stereotypes: Agree or Disagree?

3 Common Japanese Stereotypes: Agree or Disagree?

Whoever you are and wherever you go, there are common conventional thoughts that people will normally characterize you by based on your nationality. This is what you call “stereotyping.” It can be both positive and negative. Americans are stereotyped as friendly, generous, hardworking and optimistic in the positive sense. Negatively, they are viewed as materialistic, racist, gun-loving, environmentally-unconscious and many more. How about the Japanese people? Below are some of the most common Japanese stereotypes you may have heard of.

Japanese Girls are Sweet and Cute

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It is said that Japanese girls often try to act cute in order to attract men. This is probably where the word “kawaii” came from. Kawaii means lovable, cute or adorable. Cuteness is accepted in Japan as part of their culture. The idea of cuteness is ever more popular nowadays which can be seen in their lolita fashion or kawaii fashion.

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Both men and women act cute in Japan. Is it a yay or a nay?

Polite and Shy

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It is quite often when you can find a Japanese person who’s usually polite and less outspoken. This is one of the unshakable characteristics of their personality and culture which is passed from one generation to the other. They try to respect other person’s opinion without causing an argument. Most of them would love to be part of the crowd rather than lead it. They don’t seem to like too much attention!

Getting Married Late

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Statistically speaking, the population in Japan keeps on declining. One factor is the late age couples marry in the country. A Japanese friend once told me that it is primarily caused by business at work and lack of day care centers as well as babysitters who will take care of the children while parents are working. The financial situation has a big influence on the number of children in the typical Japanese family.

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