Ancient Tokyo–Time travelling at Tokyo Edo Museum

  • TOKYO
  • SUMIDA
  • SPOT
  • __E.常設展

    Have you ever imagined how Tokyo must have been before all the skyscrapers came and before technology hit the country? What was Tokyo like, during the Edo period?
    The old name of Tokyo was Edo, until 1868, when the Edo period ended and the Meiji era started. The Edo period stands for a time, where Samurai where powerful and old traditions were well respected. But what was it really like to live there? To work there? You can easily find out the answers in “Tokyo Edo Museum” at Ryogoku station, which is just 3min. away from Akihabara station.

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    The museum has a permanent exhibition, temporary ones and frequently events. You will find 21 different sections in the permanent exhibition. One of the most impressing thing is the full-sized Nihonbashi-brigde that is accessible for all visitors!
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    Being very different from an art museum, you can easily spend the whole day at the permanent exhibition, where you can see scale model replicas of Edo Castle and the district zones, how people used to live during that time, common houses and occupations, art and publications, economic activities, old money, life in the villages around Edo and islands, entertainment districts of Edo, cultural aspects, how enlightenment reached Edo and all the historic aspects until Edo became Tokyo and WW2 happened.

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    You can enjoy the museum visually, audio wise and even physically by being able to touch some things or even sit in a real ricksha!

    Its opening hours are 9:30 – 17:30 ( only on Saturdays:9:30 – 19:30) and it is closed on Monday.(Though if a national holiday or its substitute falls on a Monday, the Museum is OPEN and is closed on the next day.)

    Fees

    • adults – ¥600
    • university students – ¥480
    • seniors over 65 years – ¥300
    • Jr.High + High school students outside of Tokyo – ¥300
    • Jr.High + High school students from Tokyo – free
    • Primary school students – free

    Check out the museum’s special website to get into the mood of Edo!
    Access