By charles.wood88

How to Fully Enjoy Tsukiji, Tokyo’s Famous Fish Market

Featured on countless “Top Ten Things to do in Tokyo” lists, Tsukiji is a must see for any Tokyo itinerary. Centrally located near shopping district Ginza, this wholesale fish and seafood market is the largest in the world. It’s divided into two parts. The outer market houses restaurants and shops selling restaurant wares like knives…

3 Of The Most Moving Stories and Tributes to Dogs in Tokyo

The cat vs dog debate will rage for ages, but whether one is a dog lover (犬派) or cat lover (猫派), most people can agree that the loyalty and warmth of dogs are unrivaled in the animal world. In Japan, there are a few places in particular that honor the special bond between dogs and…

Meet Strange Ghosts and Monsters in the Otherworldly City of Chofu (Tokyo)

In Japanese folklore, there are two types of mythical beings: yokai and yurei. There is a dizzying array of classification systems with the precise definitions varying by author and time period, and regardless of which you choose, there will always be fuzzy exceptions and beings that are hard to classify. That being said, in modern…
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Do You Know Where Tokyo’s Hipster Paradise Is?

In search of the perfect vintage t-shirt for a friend with discerning tastes? Had your fill of the main sights of Tokyo and looking for something off the beaten track? Spend an afternoon in Koenji, a small neighborhood just ten minutes west of Shinjuku by train. Taking A Look Around I was recently inspired to…

The Infamous Hadaka Matsuri (Naked Festival): Do You Have What It Takes?

Every third weekend in February, nine thousand nearly nude men brave the cold in a night of gladiatorial combat at Sadaiji Temple in Okayama prefecture. The reward? A talisman granting a year of happiness and luck, or at the very least a whopping tale to tell when you get back home. History There are a…

5 Reasons Yotsubato is the Best Manga for Learning Japanese

Hello future fluent Japanese speaker! So you’ve learned katakana, mastered hiragana, and studied your way through an introductory textbook like Genki or Minna no Nihongo. What’s next? It’s time to start reading native Japanese materials. But what to read? Children’s books are boring and just looking at the pages of kanji in a novel can…