Japanese sweets

Wanna Have a Taste of the Galaxy? Try Japan’s Milky Way Youkan!

When you spend summer in Japan, you will notice that there is a festival related to the stars on the 7th of July every year. This festival, known as Tanabata, celebrates the annual meeting of the deities Orihime and Hikoboshi. It is custom for people to write their wishes on colorful strips of paper and…

Kintaro-ame: Try some Traditional Handmade Japanese Candy

You have likely seen this candy before as there is a popular international candy chain called Sticky which produces similar candy. This type of candy actually originates from Japan, and it is known as Kintaro-ame. Kintaro Kintaro is a folk hero who is a child with incredible strength. Kintaro is translated as “Golden Boy” and…

Don’t Miss These 4 Very Japanese Delicacies in Kanazawa!

Are you planning to visit Kanazawa? Some of the most spectacular scenery in Japan can be found in the Hokuriku region where Kanazawa is, an area located in the northwest part of Honshu (the main island). Besides having great destinations for travel, the place is also blessed with various produce coming from the land and…

Try Melonpan, the Delicious Sweet Bread from Japan

On almost every corner of the Japanese city streets, you can see a lot of sweet bread on sale in different bakeries. But do you know which one of these is one of the most popular for both young and old? It is the melonpan (melon bread)! It is a type of sweet bun with…

Shikamaro-kun Choco-Mochi Sweets: Nara’s Delicious ’Deer Poop’ Souvenirs!

Anyone who knows me will be well aware of my slight obsession with Shikamaro-kun, the oh-so-cute yuru-chara (mascot) of the Nara City Tourist Association. As such, any sort of chocolatey snack with his face on it was a sure sell and I left Nara with a collection of Shikamaro-kun mochi sweets to try. Mochi Author’s…

Wagashi Calendar: Kirizansho in November

History In the Kyuureki (旧暦) which is also called the lunisolar calendar, November was previously called Shimotsuki (霜月). As the name suggests, this is the month when frost falls as the weather gets colder with each passing day. There are also other names which also refer to November although they may not be as commonly…

Mannendou: Exquisite Traditional Japanese Sweets Shop

In Japan, sweets are distinguished into two types, the Yogashi and Wagashi. Yogashi are your ordinary western sweets that have been introduced to Japan. Wagashi on the other hand, are traditional sweets that are originally made in Japan. Mannendo is a famous Japanese sweets store that is located in Ginza and has been around providing…

Wagashi Calendar: Japanese Sweets and When to Expect Your Favourites

Before the year 1873 in the 6th year of the Meiji era, the calendar system used in Japan was called the kyuureki (旧暦) which is literally translated as “old calendar” or also known as the lunisolar calendar. Despite the prevalence of the Gregorian calendar these days, the kyuureki is still widely used for traditional festivals…

Love Japanese Sweets? Try Sasa Dango, a Traditional Niigata Specialty!

If you are a fan of Japanese traditional sweets, especially sticky rice cakes (dango), then you might also love the sasa dango. Sasa dango rice cakes wrapped with bamboo leaves is a traditional sweet from the Nigata prefecture. Sasa dango used to be the traditional sweet for the boy’s festival (Tango no sekku) on May…