onomatopoeia

5 Japanese Onomatopoeia Words That DON’T Express Sounds!

As we all know, onomatopoeia, or words to explain sounds, varies depending on the language. For example, a dog says “bark” in English while it says “wan” in Japanese. Given the wide range of variety, onomatopoeia is a reflection of the culture of a country. Interestingly for Japan, while American comics are filled with “Bam!”s…

What Are They Saying? – 10 Practical Japanese Onomatopoeias

Learning a new language can be tough, especially when people speak fast and use a lot of local lingo. Japanese, as complicated as it may seem, can be picked up easily if you have the dedication and the know how. One of the more difficult things to get are the sounds. There are a lot…

Japanese Onomatopoeia: How Many Words Do You Know?

Like in English, Japan has its own onomatopoeia called giongo (擬音語). Words, which phonetically imitate the sound that they describe, are not rare things. In Japanese though, the range and variety is so wide, that onomatopoeia is even divided in two categories, giongo (擬音語)) and gitaigo (擬態語). Whereas giongo is mainly describing sounds of things,…

Animal Sounds in Japanese

jp.fotolia.com/ Same as traditional festivals and behaviour reflect the country’s culture, so does language and the words that are chosen to express different things. Just as women used to say, that they “need to powder their nose”, when they wanted to go to the toilet, instead of naming it directly, Japanese too, have an euphemism…